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M-1 Helmet Production Breakage V - Part Deux Schlueter & Sharon

Big Red

Big Red here with a question from "Jack Haley"...

    So, TAKE FIVE!

    Jack asks,

    "Big Red, you mentioned that one of the solutions to make up for the losses due to production breakage was to “supplement” the current contract. Does that mean Schlueter?"

    Great to hear from you Jack,

    Yup, that means Schlueter but it also means Sharon.

    By 1942 M-1 helmet losses due to production breakage was averaging 30%. It was painfully evident to the Ordnance Department that they had a serious problem on their hands that, if left unresolved, could prevent the production of helmets from meeting demand.

    The higher rate of loss was largely due to the September 5, 1941 notification that total helmet assemblies would no longer be accepted by the Army if they exceeded 3-pounds. Choosing to enforce this requirement lead to the reduction in gauge of helmet stock from 0.046 to 0.044 inches thick, which exacerbated breakage in the drawing and visor spanking operations.

    November 1941, in order to focus on resolving helmet production problems, the Ordnance Department requested to have their responsibility for further liner development transferred to the Quartermaster Department. Then, with the assistance of specialists from McCord Radiator, Carnegie-Illinois Steel and their labs at Watertown Arsenal, they formulated a plan to address the breakage problem by attempting to perfect helmet stock and improve fabrication techniques but still needed a way to make up for the current losses.

     

     

     

    On June 6, 1942 a contract was issued to the Schlueter Manufacturing Company of St. Louis Missouri for the fabrication of helmet bodies and around the same time, a contract for helmet steel was issued to the only other steel provider in the United States with experience working with manganese steel, Sharon Steel Corporation, Sharon, Pennsylvania.

     

     

     

    The decision to supplement the contracts with McCord Radiator and Carnegie-Illinois was intended to make up for current production losses due to breakage. In reality however, the introduction of Schlueter and Sharon to the helmet program actually increased the breakage problem.

     


    Remember,

    if your friends want to know how you gained your intel, tell em

     

    Big Red Says!

    FIVE'S OVER  -  MOVE OUT!


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